Capes Not Vapes: Living Drug-Free

Crowdis+explains+the+results+of+a+poll+question+regarding+the+increasing+number+of+poison+control+calls+due+to+the+use+of+liquid+nicotine+and+e-cigarettes.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Capes Not Vapes: Living Drug-Free

Crowdis explains the results of a poll question regarding the increasing number of poison control calls due to the use of liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Crowdis explains the results of a poll question regarding the increasing number of poison control calls due to the use of liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Maya Sabbaghian

Crowdis explains the results of a poll question regarding the increasing number of poison control calls due to the use of liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Maya Sabbaghian

Maya Sabbaghian

Crowdis explains the results of a poll question regarding the increasing number of poison control calls due to the use of liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes.

Maya Sabbaghian, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Three hundred six students from all Irvine high schools gathered to learn about the dangers of vaping and drugs at Lakeview Senior Center during the “Capes Not Vapes” forum held by the Youth Action Team on Oct. 25, according to a YAT representative.

“I thought [the presentation] was really fun,” freshman Angela Xiang said. “Going into this, I was expecting a two-hour lecture of just someone talking, but I thought it was really interesting because they made it interactive and easy to follow.”

Various speakers used an interactive presentation, including a poll, to inform students on statistics regarding drugs and vaping. The poll results showed that some of the statistics were well-known while others seemed new to the audience.  

“What shocked me the most was that only 9% [of Irvine Students] vaped,” Xiang said. “I thought it was a lot higher, and I think in a way I kind of underestimated it.”

The speakers of the forum are from various organizations in Orange County that work to fight drug abuse among high school students.

“I think it’s important to catch people when they are young before they start getting involved with drugs or alcohol or tobacco,” guest speaker Ryan Crowdis said. “So I try to do prevention instead of trying to do treatment later on.”

The speakers at the event not only focused on educating students but also inspiring them to make better life choices.

“The most powerful leadership tool that each and every one of you has is your own example,” guest speaker Jessica Carranza said. “So be the best example for your friends, for your family, for your community and be the best example, more importantly, for yourself.”