Trick-or-Treating Should be Associated with Fun, Not Age

Everyone%2C+young+and+old%2C+should+be+able+to+trick-or-treat+and+have+a+night+filled+with+fun+and+candy%2C+but+have+the+responsibility+to+maintain+the+safety+of+all+by+acting+appropriately.
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Trick-or-Treating Should be Associated with Fun, Not Age

Everyone, young and old, should be able to trick-or-treat and have a night filled with fun and candy, but have the responsibility to maintain the safety of all by acting appropriately.

Everyone, young and old, should be able to trick-or-treat and have a night filled with fun and candy, but have the responsibility to maintain the safety of all by acting appropriately.

Annie Qiao

Everyone, young and old, should be able to trick-or-treat and have a night filled with fun and candy, but have the responsibility to maintain the safety of all by acting appropriately.

Annie Qiao

Annie Qiao

Everyone, young and old, should be able to trick-or-treat and have a night filled with fun and candy, but have the responsibility to maintain the safety of all by acting appropriately.

Manan Mendiratta, Assistant Sports Editor

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While teenagers may be worried about being “too old” for trick-or-treating, walking around in pursuit of candy is an unforgettable childhood memory that teenagers should be able to participate in.

“There should not be an age limit on fun,” junior Maria Pantoja said. “Everyone; kids, teens and adults included should have the liberty to have fun and feel like a child. It’s not about getting candy; it’s about having fun.”

Often teenagers may feel disappointed because they feel they are not allowed to trick-or-treat anymore because of their age, but in reality, teenagers should be able to participate in care-free activities and spend time with family or friends roaming their neighborhoods if they choose.

If your intentions are to really get candy and really not cause havoc on the neighborhood [then it is acceptable]. Are you stealing candy out of a bowl? Then no, but that could happen if you’re even 12.”

— Shelley Godett

Many worry about teenagers endangering young children or even taking the opportunity away from children to collect candy, either by taking extra candy when it is placed outside in a bowl or simply being able to trick or treat at a faster pace.

In Chesapeake, Virginia and New Brunswick, Canada, officials have set an age limit of 14 years old and 16 years old, respectively, in fear of the possible effects of allowing teenagers to roam the streets on Halloween.

“If your intentions are to really get candy and really not cause havoc on the neighborhood [then it is acceptable],” math teacher Shelley Godett said. “Are you stealing candy out of a bowl? Then no, but that could happen if you’re even 12. Or are you really like legit asking ‘trick or treat’? I’m going to be respectful, pleases and thank yous.’”

Teenagers should be able to relive fond childhood memories, but it is important to remember to dress appropriately and be polite when trick-or-treating because young children will also be on the pursuit for candy.