With+the+new+hybrid+model%2C+teachers+and+students+are+changing+their+learning+habits+to+adapt+to+the+struggles+of+distance+learning.%0A

Jaein Kim

With the new hybrid model, teachers and students are changing their learning habits to adapt to the struggles of distance learning.

Teachers and Students Share Struggles with Learning Models

September 23, 2020

Challenges were introduced for teachers and students who chose the hybrid model. Some teachers such as Kearci Moir wanted to have a larger say about decisions for the learning models. 

Art teacher Kearci Moir believes the hybrid model is not an accurate representation of safe COVID-19 protocols. According to Moir, many teachers believe that in reality the model could have flaws that risk the safety of students and staff. 

“I think that when the district came out with the hybrid plan, it sounds great on paper…One thing that I would change about it is having more teacher feedback because we didn’t really have any chance to say,” Moir said.

According to Moir, IUSD did not ask for much input from teachers when creating the hybrid model.

One thing that I would change about it is having more teacher feedback because we didn’t really have any chance to say.

— Kearci Moir

“It’s hard for me being an IUSD grad and feeling like when I was a student, I was safer than I am now as a teacher. I would still have a choice if I was a student,” Moir said.

Because of the constantly evolving nature of the pandemic, even though the models were made in July, teachers did not receive confirmation of where and what they would be teaching until a couple of weeks before school began. Furthermore, teachers are concerned about the increased screen time per day.

“I know students spend a lot of time on the computer all day, so then they are really tired at the end of the day…as teachers we feel the exact same way,” science teacher Anthony Pham said. “I think at this point I’m staring at a screen for pretty much 10-15 hours a day.”

I know students spend a lot of time on the computer all day, so then they are really tired at the end of the day…as teachers we feel the exact same way.”

— Anthony Pham

Working from a computer screen has been difficult for teachers and students. According to junior Sully Scott, using Zoom is tricky for students who have problems with technology and grasping content. 

“I’m not the biggest fan of distance learning. One of my biggest concerns with it is that I’m going to fall behind,” Scott said. “It’s a lot harder for teachers to gauge  how students are doing… I get nervous, and I don’t want to ask a teacher a question.”

It’s a lot harder for teachers to gauge  how students are doing.”

— Sully Scott

The transition into in person school could bring up new challenges for teachers and students, however, many have hope for a successful school year. 

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